Posted in spin in science writing

Spin in writing-6: A critic of a case-control study

This post is a follow-up to my previous post on the same topic, which was inspired by a journal club podcast that dealt with a research paper on Cannabis use and psychosis. The podcast was presented by Matt. Chris, and Don at the Population Health Exchange of the Boston University…

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Posted in spin in science writing

Spin in science writing – 5: Psychiatry and psychology

Earlier we saw how distorted abstract reporting – a form of spin – occurs in health research. This post dives into a specific subject area: Psychiatry and Psychology. In 2019, Samuel Jellison and his team published an excellent paper on this exact topic in the British Medical Journal. They looked…

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Posted in spin in science writing

Spin in science writing -4: non-reporting of negative outcomes

This post brings another two spin methods; reporting statistically significant secondary endpoints (outcomes) in the abstract in the absence of non-significant primary endpoints (outcome) in Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and not reporting of adverse effects of interventions. The RCTs carry the highest level of evidence strength in research. In this…

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Posted in spin in science writing

Spin in science writing – 3: Misuse of adjectives

This is my third post about spin in science writing. While the first one discussed inappropriate usage of causal language in reporting observational studies, the second focused on making inappropriate recommendations based on observational study designs. This post deals with inappropriate usage of adjectives and adjectival phrases in reporting studies…

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Posted in spin in science writing

Spin in science writing – 2: making clinical recommendations

In my previous post, I wrote about one spin method in science writing: use of causal language in reporting findings from observational study designs. This post adds another spinning method used frequently in reporting results of observational studies: making clinical recommendations based on results from observational study designs. The observational…

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Posted in spin in science writing

Spin in science writing – 2: making clinical recommendations

In my previous post, I wrote about one spin method in science writing: use of causal language in reporting findings from observational study designs. This post adds another spinning method used frequently in reporting results of observational studies: making clinical recommendations based on results from observational study designs. The observational…

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Spinning in writing
Posted in spin in science writing

Spin in science writing -1: Observational study designs

Image by StartupStockPhotos from Pixabay Spin in writing occurs all the time. And, it occurs when writing research papers too. What is “spin in writing”? It is a sort of word game that distorts the evidence shown by data. Sometimes, it may or may not be deliberate. Contrary to the…

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